The Hero’s Journey – Breath of the Wild Part I

Think back to a big change in your life: entering college, starting a career, moving to a new area. We each have a journey on this earth, a story where choices and experience shape who we become. We meet new people, suffer hardships, grow in character, and overcome challenges. And we often find ourselves drawn to stories which reflect the same.

The Hero’s Journey – which takes us through a character’s quest and his/her corresponding growth – is a well-established trope, carrying through centuries of tales from multiple cultures. And while the fiction tends to be grander than our own daily struggles, its tried and true presence proves how easily we still relate. At a certain level, the human experience remains the same.

Countless video games employ the Hero’s Journey; it’s a no brainer for genres like the RPG, where the epic scope of the story allows the player to follow a character through diverse experiences and trials. Sometimes the journeys can go a little off the rails to pad gameplay: additions of alternate dimensions, several “big bads” in succession, or the convoluted inclusion of time travel…

The more I remember FFVIII’s story, the less I understand it.

But leave it to a hallmark series to convey the Hero’s Journey. Absolutely. Perfectly.

This isn’t bias speaking. I’m no Legend of Zelda rabid fangirl who squeals at the site of Link’s face slapped on random merchandise. (Though I’ll enjoy the heck out of his games, don’t get me wrong.) It might be ignorance due to the sheer scope of video games I’ve never played. But the thing about Breath of the Wild is – you live the Hero’s Journey. Not de facto, of course – I was relaxin’ on the couch while Link was roughing it amongst Bokoblins and Guardians – but far more closely than in the experience a book or movie offers.

How does Breath of the Wild play this out? Allow me to explain by example: Less than five minutes into actual gameplay, I fell off a cliff and died from running out of climbing stamina. (All the pro gamers say, “NOOB!”) In fact, I died quite a few times just being stupid in naturally perilous situations. There’s a parallel here: At the game’s beginning, Link emerges from the Shrine of Resurrection green as the beautifully-rendered grass on the Great Plateau. And since the game won’t hold your hand first thing, you begin just as unfamiliar with the world as he.

You’re guided loosely to your first destination, but the plateau is otherwise open to explore. Nothing stops you from freezing in the snow-capped mountains, or getting gored by boars in the woods as you learn how to aim and shoot with your bow. It’s Link who suffers the injuries, but it’s the player who learns and grows through adversity. Do you want to survive beyond the Plateau? Better get those skills in gear.

And maybe find some shoes.

The hero often begins his/her journey with little knowledge or skill to handle the challenges ahead. It’s a trope that plays out perfectly in a video game format as you gather materials and hone your talents with equipment. Do you know what lies ahead? Unless you’ve watched a playthrough (like a cheaterpants)…no. And neither does Link.

But his skills – and yours – will lead to moments of growth you never imagined.

Thus ends part I of II for this short series. What, did you think I could cover a 100+ hour game in one article? Get outta here!

 

The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild is the property of Nintendo. You can purchase it to play via the Wii U or Nintendo Switch.

2 thoughts on “The Hero’s Journey – Breath of the Wild Part I

  1. Fine….cheaterpants I’ll be. 😛

    Reading this again though…….just puts some perspective on things going on that well, you know. 😉 Very much true that, we learn from the unknown and, make them our knowns (if that makes any sense. 😛 ).

    Loved reading!!!!

    Love you!!!!!!!

    1. SUCH a cheaterpants. Not that I enabled you or anything. 😉

      Making unknowns into “knowns” is tough work, isn’t it? I guess that’s why these sorts of stories have appealed to us for so long. They give us courage to tackle the challenges in our own lives.

      Thanks for reading! Love you, mon chou!

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